Blue Velvet Scene Analysis Essays On Things

David Lynch's Film, Blue Velvet Essay

1605 Words7 Pages

David Lynch's Blue Velvet is an exploration of things above and below the surface. This surface is really a borderline between not only idyllic suburban America and the dark, perverted corruption that lies underneath but also between good and evil, conscious and subconscious, dream and reality. Although this division seems quite rigid and clean-cut some of the most important implications of the film stem from the transgressions of these borderlines. In the initial scenes of the film Lynch introduces Lumberton, the typical small town in Middle America where the fireman waves at you, the children are well protected, the lawns are green and there is a smile on everybody's face. Naturally, the most important clich?

is also included—we see…show more content…

Accepting this interpretation we may consider the normalcy of Lumberton to be Jeffrey's superego and the underworld, and particularly Frank, to be his id surfacing and trying to take control of his ego. The censor who struggles to keep the id suppressed is Jeffrey himself who finally succeeds by killing Frank and thus killing his evil, instinctive self putting his id back where it belongs. Sandy may also be seen as a censor-like figure for she is firmly rooted in the superego Lumberton world and represents all the purity and innocence and love that is missing from the underworld.

According to Antulov Sandy's role in the film is "to be the voice of reason and the only link to the 'normal' world for Jeffrey" ("Review for Blue Velvet", http://reviews.imdb/Reviews/155/15529). She, however, also embodies essential goodness, making the counterpoint to the forces of evil which are luring Jeffrey away from his secure position above the surface. Moreover, she is a source of love and as such, a possible source of deliverance. There are other Freudian elements in the film as well; most of which are connected to Frank. Lost in his perverted sexual fantasies he relates to Dorothy both as her father and as her child.

In her sexual connection to Frank Dorothy may be seen to represent the Female being assaulted by all the Male figures—getting raped by the Husband who is

Show More

Scene Analysis Of David Lynch's Film, Blue Velvet

Blue Velvet: Scene Analysis

The opening scene in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet portrays the theme of the entire film. During this sequence he uses a pattern of showing the audience pleasant images, and then disturbing images to contrast the two.

The first shot of the roses over the picket fence and the title track “Blue Velvet” establishes the setting (Lumberton) as a typical suburban town. The camera starts on a bright blue sky with birds chirping and flying by and then tilts down to bright red roses over a bright white fence (red, white and blue symbolizes the American dream maybe?). Both the visual and audible aspects of this shot gives a pleasant feeling of safety and serenity.

The next shot is of a bright red fire truck slowly driving by in a neighborhood with a fireman smiling and waving with a Dalmatian by his side. This shot is sort of surrealistic and dreamlike. Lynch uses this shot to establish a sense of security. For a moment it appears that this shot is in slow motion, but only because the man is waving slowly, almost on beat with the music.

The previous shot dissolves to another shot of flowers in front of a fence; this time, yellow tulips. Once again the bright colors give the audience a sense of safety.
The next shot, of a guard waving a group of children across the street from school establishes the setting as a family town. Even the kids are well behaved, walking in a straight line carrying their bag lunches.

Each of the previous shots dissolve into each other, and each of the subsequent shots do not. The 4 previous shots are all pleasant and the dissolve technique makes them more dreamlike, while each of the next shots cut right into each other giving the sequence a faster pace.

The...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Ocean's Eleven - Film analysis of the first scene (covering Mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound, editing, and critical reception)

1844 words - 7 pages The blockbuster film Ocean's Eleven, released in 2001, was the first film of a trilogy of heist films directed by Steven Soderbergh. This big budget crime-thriller remake of the 1960's Rat Pack favourite conveys the intricately thrilling plot where Daniel Ocean leads a rag-tag group of con...

Analysis of the Last Scene of Film Frankenstein by Kenneth Branagh

1416 words - 6 pages Analysis of the Last Scene of Film Frankenstein by Kenneth Branagh The monster that Victor Frankenstein created to stop death has destroyed him emotionally. This monster has killed all that Victor ever loved. He killed his little brother, his wife, his father, and his housemaid. Wanting vengeance Victor follows the monster north in an unwavering pursuit. All he wants to do is to destroy the monster. But the monster...

Analysis of the Creation Scene from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Kenneth Branagh’s 1994 Film Version

1346 words - 5 pages Analysis of the Creation Scene from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Kenneth Branagh’s 1994 Film Version One of the key themes in Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’ is human arrogance. Frankenstein’s curiosity leads him to play the role of God. In a way Frankenstein is responsible for the monster and has ultimately become a father figure to the monster. Frankenstein abandoning the monster leads up to it turning evil and looking...

An in depth analysis of a key scene in Fritz Lange's classic film "Scarlett Street".

1409 words - 6 pages A Walk Down Scarlett Street.Fritz Lange's Scarlett Street is a film about a man betrayed by old age, the past, and the woman who represents his lost youth. When the viewer first meets the protagonist he appears to be much like any other man in the middle of his life. Christopher Cross has...

Film Analysis of Jaws

1578 words - 6 pages Film Analysis of Jaws The film Jaws was directed by a popular director called Steven Spielburg. Steven Spielburg directed some great well known films, e.g. E.T, Close Encounters of the 3rd kind and this film is a good example. The film Jaws is about a gargantuan great shark which is a man eating shark. The shark attacks many people in different terrifying and horrifying ways throughout the film and the shark ...

Film Analysis of Psycho

2048 words - 8 pages Film Analysis of Psycho PSYCHO is a unique film because it is a black and white film in the age of colour. Secondly it showed the first naked body on screen. Also it showed the first ever toilet flush. It is a dark disturbing tale as we do not know who the murderer is and what motive they have to murder Marion and inspector Aborgast. It took only three weeks to make and only cost $850,000 to make. It may not compare with...

Film Analysis Of Braveheart

962 words - 4 pages The world has been plagued with inequality issues since the beginning of time. The film Braveheart portrays this issue magnificently. Braveheart, directed...

Film Analysis of Jaws

1460 words - 6 pages Film Analysis of Jaws The film that I will be analyzing will be Jaws. The film JAWS was a trend in the summer of 1975 smashing all box office records. Over taking many box office hits and collecting in more than $100million in its initial theatrical run, and launched the career of director Steven Spielberg. The reason why it is set on 4th of July is because it is one of the busiest days of the community and a lot of...

Act 1 Scene 1 Film Version of William Shakespeare's Macbeth

1851 words - 7 pages Act 1 Scene 1 Film Version of William Shakespeare's Macbeth In Elizabethan England, witches and the supernatural were a very genuine threat to everyday life. They were recognised as an antithesis to the divinely ordained order of the universe, often attributed with unexplained disease to neighbours and to livestock, as quoted in Act 1, Scene 3 when the second witch notifies the others that she has been 'killing swine'....

Analysis of The Blue Hotel by Stephen Crane

578 words - 2 pages Analysis of The Blue Hotel by Stephen Crane "The Blue Hotel" by Stephen Crane is a story about three travelers passing through Fort Romper, Nebraska. Pat Scully, the owner of the Palace Hotel, draws the men to his hotel that is near the train station. In the hotel the three men meet Johnnie, son of Scully, and agree to play a game of cards with him. During the game, the Swede declares Johnnie as a cheater; this gives rise to a fistfight...

Analysis of Suicide by David Hume

1259 words - 5 pages Analysis of Of Suicide by David Hume "I believe that no man ever threw away life, while it was worth keeping." In David Hume's essay "Of Suicide," the philosophical argument of justified suicide is pursued. However, the underlying argument focuses on the injustification of the government and society condemning and forbidding such an action and the creation of superstitions and falsehoods of religion and God. Hume argues that the last...

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Blue Velvet Scene Analysis Essays On Things”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *